Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2020, Page: 99-105
Profit Analysis of Virus Free Sweet Potato and Vine Multiplication by Smallholder Farmers in Selected Regions of Tanzania
Castory Kibiki, Department of Agricultural Economics, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
Khamadin Daud Mutabazi, Department of Agricultural Economics, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
Fred Tairo, Tanzania Agricultural Research Institute, Mikocheni, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Received: Jun. 2, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 23, 2020;       Published: Jul. 13, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijae.20200504.12      View  59      Downloads  50
Abstract
Sweet potato production using certified virus free vines and virus free vine multiplication promote high yields which are significant for enhancing food security and income generation among small holder farmers. This study examines the cost and benefit of sweet potato tuber production using certified virus free vines and virus free vine multiplication among smallholder farmers in the Lake Victoria and Coastal Zones in Tanzania. Primary data were collected from 495 sweet potato farmers and virus free vine multipliers using survey tool (questionnaire). About 362 farmers who are producers sweet potato tubers and 133 farmers who are virus free vine producers were chosen from each zone using simple random sampling technique. The cost and benefit analysis were calculated using Microsoft Excel 2007. The findings of the study showed that the benefit of sweet potato production using certified virus free vines in Lake Victoria Zone was 1,284,665.64 Tanzanian shillings per hectare and that in Coastal Zone was 1,159,524.60 Tanzanian shillings per hectare. Furthermore, was revealed that benefit of virus free sweet potato vine multiplication in Lake Zone was 219,086.54 Tanzanian shillings per hectare and in Coastal Zone was 305 948.59 Tanzanian shillings per hectare. The Benefit Cost Ratio obtained in sweet potato production using certified virus free vines in Lake Zone was 5.04 per hectare and Coastal zone was 3.71 per hectare. The Benefit Cost Ratio obtained in virus free sweet potato vine multiplication in Lake Zone was 2.91 per hectare and Coastal zone was 2.11 per hectare. Therefore, investment in sweet potato tuber production using virus free vines and virus free vine multiplication is worth undertaking in both Zones since farmers generate profit and hence enhanced food security.
Keywords
Cost-Benefit, Income Generation, Planting Materials, Viral Disease
To cite this article
Castory Kibiki, Khamadin Daud Mutabazi, Fred Tairo, Profit Analysis of Virus Free Sweet Potato and Vine Multiplication by Smallholder Farmers in Selected Regions of Tanzania, International Journal of Agricultural Economics. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2020, pp. 99-105. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20200504.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Kreuze, J. F, Perez, A, Gargurevich, M. G and Cuellar, W. J. (2020). Badnaviruses of Sweet Potato: Symptomless Co-inhabitants on a Global Scale. Frontier in Plant Science, 11: 313. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2020.00313.
[2]
FAOSTAT (Food and Agriculture Organization Statistics). (2017) of the United Nations.
[3]
Sebastiani S. K, Mgonja, A, Urio, F and Ndondi, T. (2007). Agronomic and economic benefits of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) response to application of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer in the northern highlands of Tanzania. The Eighth African Crop Science Society Conference, African Crop Science Society, El-minia, Egypt 2007, pp. 1207-1210.
[4]
Ngailo, S, Shimelis, H. A, Sibiya, J and Mtunda, K. 2015. Sweet potato farming systems, production constraints and breeding priorities, Sugarcane Research Institute, Kibaha, Tanzania, Journal of Plant and Soil, pp 1–8.
[5]
Tairo, F, Kullaya, A and Valkonen, J. P. T. 2004. Incidence of viruses infecting sweet potato in Tanzania. Plant Disease, 88 (9): 916-920.
[6]
Ndunguru, G, Tomlins, K, Kimenya, F, Ngendello, T, Rwiza, E, Amour, R, Oirschot van, Q and Westby, A. 2008. On farm evaluation of methods for storing fresh sweet potato roots in East Africa, 47: 197-210.
[7]
Karyeija, R, Kreuze, J, Gibson, R and Valkonen, J. 2000. Two Serotypes of Sweetpotato feathery mottle virus in Uganda and their Interaction with Resistant Sweetpotato Cultivars, Phytopathology, 90: 1250-5.
[8]
Bio-Earn report. 2008. Bio-resources Innovations Network for Eastern Africa Development (Bio-Innovate).
[9]
McEwan, M. 2016. Sweet potato Seed Systems in sub-Saharan Africa: A literature review to contribute to the preparation of conceptual frameworks to guide practical interventions for root, tuber and banana seed systems. Lima (Peru). 45 p. RTB Working Paper. ISSN 2309-6586. no. 2016-4.
[10]
Mulongo, G, Maru, J, Munyua, H, Kasuga, R, Olapeju, P, Wende, M, Rubyogo, J. C and Gethi, J. 2018. The Building Nutritious Food Baskets Project ‘Insights from the Field’. International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, Peru. 48 p. https://hdl.handle.net/10568/98539
[11]
Mwiti, K. F. 2015. Assessment of willingness to pay for quality sweet potato planting materials, University of Nairobi, Kenya. https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/269713/files/FLORIN-Thesis.pdf
[12]
Vernooy, R. 2017. Options for national governments to support smallholder farmer seed systems: The cases of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. The Hague (Netherlands): Hivos, 26 p.
[13]
URT (United Republic of Tanzania). 2017. Annual agriculture sample survey initial report 2016/17. https://nbs.go.tz/nbs/takwimu/Agriculture/2016_17_AAS_report.pdf
[14]
Kothari, R. C. 2004. Research Methodology, Methods and techniques, University of Rajasthan, India, New Age International publisher, 2nd Edition.
[15]
Fuglie, O. K, Zhang, L, Salazar, F. L, Walker, S. T. 1999. Economic Impact of Virus-Free Sweet potato Planting Material in Shandong Province, China, International Potato Center Lima, Peru. 27p.
[16]
KARI (Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute). 2019. Cost benefit analysis of sweet potato based on farm enterprises in central Uganda.
Browse journals by subject